Buying a car can be difficult for even the most accomplished of drivers. The art of haggling, the way to find faults with second hand cars, and the ability to see when you’re being sold a lemon are all things that can affect the end price of a vehicle, and they’re all things that are 50% skill and 50% luck.

There are, of course, ways to increase your chances of getting a better deal on a car, and unlike other purchases many car salespeople will actually negotiate on the final cost of a vehicle if you know how to convince them. This is a list of 7 ways on how to do just that.


The first item on this list is one of the most obvious ones too. Asking for a better deal might seem foolish or obvious, but in all honesty it’s the thing many people don’t think of when it comes to finding a better price. At the end of the day, the salesperson wants the money they’ll get from the commision of the sale, and the sooner they sell it the sooner they get paid. Not asking for a better price is the only way you’re assured to not get a better price.


A roadworthy certificate can cost extra on top of the price of a car, but it’s a good idea to get one no matter where you’re getting it from because it can save you a lot of money in the long run. Roadworthy checks involve checking every vital system and part of your car that is legally required to be functioning properly to consider it “road worthy”. Spending a bit extra on this certificate can save you a larger cost later down the line, and getting one of the handy car loans from latitude can help to offset this initial cost anyway.

Buy Second Hand

Buying a new car is a goal for many people, for obvious reasons. The car has never been in an accident, has almost never travelled any kilometers at all, and is entirely brand new, meaning it doesn’t have any long-use service needs yet. Unfortunately, this also costs a lot, and so for someone looking to pay less for a car, brand new isn’t usually the way to go. Second hand cars are much cheaper as a general rule, and if you’re buying from a car yard they can still have some of the same guarantees of quality.

Buy Private

Buying from a private individual can be much cheaper than car yards, sometimes by enormous amounts of money, but there are risks involved. If not buying through a company, you won’t be protected by consumer rights, and you can end up buying a car that has something seriously wrong with it without realising. Be careful and investigate the car thoroughly and you’ll have yourself a good deal.

Cheaper Brands

Buying a Volkswagen or an Audi might be your goal in terms of vehicle ownership, but the cost difference between that and a Subaru is astounding. A brand new Audi can cost as much as $100,000, whereas a showroom Subaru can be as little as $20,000. Servicing costs should be taken into account too, with higher-end cars costing up to $1,300 for a general service when no repairs are required, and mid-range cars costing $400-$700 when no repairs are required.

Buy Appropriate Vehicle

If you live in the country and spend most of your time driving along dirt tracks, a lowered, luxury sports car is not exactly an appropriate vehicle choice for your kind of driving. Buying an appropriate car will ensure you not only get the most use out of it, but also that you don’t damage it using it for something it wasn’t designed to be used for. Just because you have a double garage in your suburban home doesn’t mean you need an enormous 4WD to fill both car parks.

Bring a Haggler

Finally, bringing a haggler with you is always a good idea. Haggling requires a certain amount of shamelessness, as you proceed to tell people what their goods are worth and how much you’ll pay for them needs one to have a little knowledge about the product and a great deal of confidence. Bringing someone that is known to be a good haggler is a good idea, as it helps you to land a better price on your new car.

With these tips you’re sure to get the best deal on your new wheels, so be sure to drive a hard bargain with this very important purchase.