Basketball is a team game, and teamwork is essential to a pleasant athletic experience. As a result, each player and parents owe it to their teammates, and coaches to be accountable for the team, volunteer, and organizational responsibilities. 

Although kids need to be especially dedicated to the training and the games, there are certain things that parents should adhere to as well. The most important role as a parent of a young basketball player is to provide a positive atmosphere for your child, which requires discipline on your part. 

It takes considerable planning to organize training sessions and especially for travel for competitions and games. Here’s a handy checklist to get you started with all the other things that you should keep in mind:

Both kids and parents should be dedicated to the sport.

Although it is important for all players to have a good time, that is not the main aim of the traveling basketball team. This is a high-level basketball experience that necessitates effort and devotion from players, their families, and coaches. Players should attend all the training sessions except some excused absences which should be reported to the coach by parents. If a parent cannot access a representative of the training team to inform them about missed training or matches, they must leave a message, text, or email. Contact does not include making an attempt to call without leaving a message. 

Do your best to provide young players with the right equipment and sports gear.

Basketballs vary and you may have to make research to find out what’s the best ball for the level, skills, and gender of your kids. 29.5 basketball which is more appropriate for boys and men can be an option, or the 28.5 indoor basketball which is ideal for girls and women. If your kids are really young, you may consider getting a small kids size in order to grasp it more easily and learn the game and postures better.

Carry sports and recreational stuff.

Consider tournament travel as small road trips and become a master at preparing for the road, whether you’re going to a nearby city or across the country. When traveling with children, you must pack for each trip, taking into account the distance and the number of family members. Prepare your car with activities, games, music, portable DVD players, and tablets, in addition to favorite binkies, warm blankets, snacks, and drinks, to keep your kids occupied and your hands-free on the trip.

Examine the tournament’s surroundings.

If you’re visiting the city/province for the first time, familiarize yourself with the tournament’s location before booking your accommodations. It will be critical to have access to services such as restaurants, supermarkets, and petrol stations, especially if you have children or family with you.

Be ready for sports-related injuries.

Make sure to purchase appropriate travel insurance for the tournament season, and look for more cost-effective solutions like family travel insurance plans. Make a list of local emergency contact numbers to be extra organized.

Carry a sports first aid kit in the vehicle for minor injuries. Sprain sprays, bandages, and ice packs should all be included.

Avoid post-game Analysis at all costs.

Players are frequently in the family car driving back within minutes of a game’s completion. Some well-intentioned parents deliver a post-game review of how the youngster performed at the game during the ride home.

The issue is that these analyses can quickly detract from your basketball player’s enjoyment. And besides, who wants to be examined or ridiculed shortly after leaving the field (and it might be even more disheartening if pals are in the car)? That is the coach’s responsibility. Give your child a break, Mom and Dad; hold your “constructive critique” until later in the evening or the next day, when you can bring them up in a two-way dialogue about the game. It’s time to be upbeat and succinct after the game.

At matches, refrain from shouting or screaming from the stands.

If you have to make a lot of noise, make sure it’s positive and supportive. There isn’t a single young athlete on the court who wants to listen to their parent shout at the referees, the trainer, the other athletes, or, even worse, at themselves. Praise nice plays on the opposition team, too, to set a good example for other adults. To put it another way, someone needs to be the adult in these games, and it might as well be you!

I hope this guide will help you have the most of your kids’ games and help you create a strong parent – kids bond that will last forever.