Motorsports are some of the most anticipated sports events in the world. The industry receives about $5.7 billion in annual sponsorships and has recently established an internal Olympic-like competition: the FIA Motorsport Games. Among its variations, car racing remains one of the most popular. However, unlike traditional sports, racing is not something that people can easily commit to, for reasons including geography, accessibility, and safety. 

The best compromise that offers the thrill of vehicle racing without having to commit to the sport physically is by using a remote control car. Essentially, remote-controlled cars are scaled-down models that replicate popular race cars for consumers to enjoy. While some treat them as collectibles, toys, or something to play with as a hobby, others take the game to actual competitions. 

Same Tricks, Different Controls 

While a remote control car looks like a toy at first glance, manufacturers equip them with high-performing motors and receivers that react to a handheld controller. This mechanism will allow you to fully “drive” the car and perform jumps, tricks, stunts, and drifts. Much like actual racing, RC cars require plenty of practice to master — so much so that it has joined e-sports and other controller-based sports in official competitions. Depending on where you live, you can even join clubs where you can connect with a community of remote control car enthusiasts, join events, learn new tricks, and train. 

Picking Out a Vehicle Size 

There are thousands of remote control car models available online, and it can be a challenge to choose the right one for your needs. But there are a couple of things that you can consider to narrow the list down to your preferences. First of all, each model is scaled based on the size of a real car. For instance, a scale means that the vehicle is of the size of a real car. 

Large sizes can withstand tougher terrain and are less prone to breakage, but require an open area to use. National-level competitions favour the ⅛ scale, which is comparatively faster, so if you plan to compete, then choose this size. Meanwhile, the 1/10 scale is the most common among non-competitive players, while anything smaller is a great entry-level model that can be used indoors by children and beginners. A point to note is that a remote control car sold in toy stores are vastly different from hobby-grade models, as the latter contains servos and other essential motor features

A Stimulating Experience 

Racing is adrenaline-fueled because it is loud, fast, and exciting. Despite the size and mechanics of RC cars, they emulate the same loud noise, the same engine-starting excitement, and similar speed to a real race car, so you can get on a race track and ride with the wind. Depending on the terrain that you plan to race in, you may want to choose on or off-road vehicles. Most races are held on actual tracks, and if the area you live in has more roads than dirt, then it is best to pick an on-road model. If there are no remote control car clubs around your area, then consider organising a local group or getting your friends to join in on the fun. While you can enjoy the hobby alone, actual racing experience against others is far more thrilling. 

Getting into remote control cars requires a decent level of patience, but with the right resources and dedication, you should be well on your way to the newly formed global competitions. Take it slow and enjoy the ride while you are at it. Even the most competitive hobbies are primarily fueled by passion, after all.